00:01 

Интервью Бретта и Хардвика

Путник&
Извините, если уже было.
Очень здорово просто полюбоваться актерами, но хотелось бы еще знать, о чем они говорят (судя по всему о сериале). Может, кто-нибудь будет так добр перевести?


@темы: Экранизация с Джереми Бреттом

Комментарии
2012-11-23 в 00:19 

Ирма Банева
Серый лебедь

На всякий случай, вдруг не видно.

2012-11-23 в 00:32 

logastr
I sit cross-legged and try not to levitate too much! (с)
Люблю это интервью очень!
Но Бретта я еще понимаю, а вот Хардвика почти нет=)

2012-11-23 в 00:34 

Путник&
logastr, да, собственно, Хардвик там мало что говорит. Бретта понять было бы интереснее)

2012-11-24 в 00:02 

Ирма Банева
Серый лебедь
Так что, переведёт кто-нибудь? Интересно же...

2012-11-24 в 00:32 

Путник&
Ирма Банева, добавим немножко жалостливости)


2012-11-24 в 00:49 

Ирма Банева
Серый лебедь
Путник&, ничего себе "немного". ))

2012-11-24 в 00:52 

Путник&
Ирма Банева *по секрету*, у меня еще есть, если что)

2012-11-24 в 00:58 

Ирма Банева
Серый лебедь
Путник&, ловля переводчиков на живца гифки? Мне нравится эта идея. Не поймаем, так хоть полюбуемся. ))

2012-11-24 в 01:03 

Путник&
Ирма Банева, раз уж нам ничего другого не остается)
*Щас наткнулась на миленькое такое видео, даже моих нулевых познаний хватило, чтобы понять - просит денег. И так "спасибо" говорит в конце, что хочется дать. (если интересно www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage...)*

2012-11-24 в 01:04 

logastr
I sit cross-legged and try not to levitate too much! (с)
Путник&, я тоже гифку могу повесить!



сейчас он точно придет, переводчик! :laugh:

2012-11-24 в 01:09 

Ирма Банева
Серый лебедь
Путник&,
И так "спасибо" говорит в конце, что хочется дать.
Хорошо сказано. Действительно хочется. :-D

2012-11-24 в 01:32 

Путник&
logastr, хорошо вам смеяться над страждущими...
Ирма Банева, вы правы, хоть полюбуемся :lip:

2012-11-24 в 01:37 

logastr
I sit cross-legged and try not to levitate too much! (с)
Путник&, я не смеюсь=) Просто мне, чтобы переводить со слуха не хватает знаний языка, я понимаю только в общих чертах, что они говорят о спектакле "Секрет Шерлока Холмса" в основном, ну и о сериале тоже. Бретт говорит свое знаменитое "демейдж пингвин" про Холмса (:alles: ) и так далее.
Но мне уже пообещали перевести поподробнее!

2012-11-24 в 01:39 

Путник&
logastr, ура!

2012-11-24 в 10:43 

Ирма Банева
Серый лебедь
Путник&, полюбоваться - это я всегда...

2012-11-24 в 22:27 

У меня есть текст интервью на англ., этого интервью и нескольких других; хотите? могу выложить

Кошка

URL
2012-11-24 в 22:54 

Ирма Банева
Серый лебедь
Кошка
А перевода нет? Хотя текст, наверное, перевести будет проще... Когда переводчик придёт.

2012-11-24 в 22:55 

Путник&
Гость, хотим!

2012-11-25 в 22:20 

koudai
specific dream rabbit
держите, перевела. могут быть не точности, но в целом старалась повнимательнее.
читать дальше

2012-11-25 в 22:26 

Ирма Банева
Серый лебедь
koudai, огромное спасибо! :red:

2012-11-25 в 22:53 

Путник&
koudai, спасибо!!!

2012-11-26 в 03:48 

Vot eto interview :)

Koshka
~~~
Interview with Richard and Judy - Jeremy Brett and Edward Hardwicke

Begins with a series of clips regarding Sherlock Holmes and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Shows how Stonyhurst College influenced Doyle and Doyle himself talks about his creation - the letters he received addressed to Holmes and "his rather stupid friend" Dr. Watson. Some of these letters were women asking to be SH's housekeeper, hehe.

RM: Well joining us now is Jeremy Brett and as Conan Doyle might have put it, 'his rather stupid friend Edward Hardwicke'. Holmes and Watson in ITV's latest series. You see this is interesting, because you're carrying on the tradition in the Granada series of playing Watson as an intelligent man, and yet we just heard Conan Doyle saying he's a rather stupid man. He didn't write him as a stupid man, did he?

EH: Well I'm glad I didn't see that before we started - (all laugh)

RM: - sue him for libel.

RM: What do you think?

JB: Don't you think he meant, the letters were saying he was stupid, but in actual fact he wasn't stupid, it was just the way they picked him up.

RM: I think you're right, yes.

JB: Got poor Doyle off the hook.

RM: It's true though isn't it that Watson was traditionally played as a bit of a dimwit, and you know, a sidekick. That's gone now. I mean, your predecessor David Burke and now you are carrying on a new tradition as playing him as a bit of a clever-clogs.

JB: That was Michael Cox's idea, our producer, who wanted to put literature straight. I think that was why the series was originally thought of.

JF: Difficult though, for you to sort of inject, because he is, isn't he, always so subservient to Holmes. Holmes always has the upper hand in every scene

URL
2012-11-26 в 03:49 

EH: Well, I mean Watson writes the stories, the assumption is that he's keeping the record and I mean Holmes is a genius. It's an interesting idea that you have a fictional genius, one of the few writers who has created a fictional genius and I think anybody is going to be stupid or seem to be a bit slow by comparison.

RM: Yes, absolutely.

EH: Inevitably.

RM: This is the third time we've spoken to you, Jeremy, how many years is it now since you've been playing Holmes?

JB: I was asked in '82 and started into '83.

RM: Yes, yes, 8 or 9 years. Has it been, Judy was saying earlier, a kind of journey of discovery for you? Do you know see him differently than you did 4 years ago and from that point -

JB: - Yes, I see him as the elusive pimpernel still, just in front of me. I can't catch him. I think it's why I him so fascinating to play 'cause I can't reach him. It is the most fascinating part I've ever played.

JF: I loved what Conan Doyle was saying earlier in the tape, that he started writing Sherlock Holmes stories because he got irritated with the detective stories he was reading, I suppose the Agatha Christie type thing where there is a sudden happening and ah ha, we therefore know the truth. There is no clear deductive process, what fascinated him was the deductions -

JB: - that's right.

JF: And that's what fascinates you, isn't it, and always has done.

JB: I think that it's always been the thing that has fascinated me about him, the fact that he not only has brilliant logic, brilliant observation but he also has a brilliant feminine intuition...(smiles) which looking at Doyle with that big whoop-whoop moustache you'd hardly imagine he would have. But I think he endowed Holmes with that as well. You see, what is fascinating is that dear gentle man created these two people and therefore I do think they are two halves of the same pod.

URL
2012-11-26 в 03:50 

RM: Yes, yes.

JF: That dear gentle man created a character in Holmes who has an extremely dark side to him.

JB: Yes, I think looking at Stonyhurst then I think I can understand where the chill might have come up his spine. Not a great warm place.

RM: He seemed an affable old buffer, talking there, but he wrote about a quality of friendship in a very sensitive way, which you both now interpret in a television production. This great bond borne between two Victorian men.

JB: It was friendship when friendship was allowed and respectable.

EH: The great era of the club and I think they are both clubbable characters. I mean that's gone now, that sort of male friendship.

JF: Yes, but as you yourself noted, I read, that the relationship between Holmes and Watson is the basis for a lot of other relationships in fictional detective work ever since, particularly on the telly, you quoted things like Starsky and Hutch.

EH: True. Yes well I think, Jeremy once said all these programmes have a book-end; they have a scene at the beginning and a scene at the end, and to some extent they are the modern version of Holmes and Watson.

JB: They work as a double act to a large degree. It's like John Thaw and Kevin. We all have to relate off somebody and maybe this was one of the originals - friendships - but it's been taken forward because it's a very good format.

JF: It's interesting that it always works with two men, as well, isn't it, certainly in the detective field. I suspect what you're talking about, the era of the Victorian gentleman's club and everything, that it was sort of acceptable to show that kind of soft spot or emotion for each other in the tight world of the detective format.

JB: They did try with Dr. Watson as a woman with Joanna Woodward - I haven't seen it.

RM: Really?

JB: Yes, yes Joanna Woodward.

JF: Extraordinary. Who played Holmes?

JB: George C. Scott I think.

EH: That's two things I've heard this morning which are deeply worrying. (All laugh)

URL
2012-11-26 в 03:51 

RM: Yes, yes.

JF: That dear gentle man created a character in Holmes who has an extremely dark side to him.

JB: Yes, I think looking at Stonyhurst then I think I can understand where the chill might have come up his spine. Not a great warm place.

RM: He seemed an affable old buffer, talking there, but he wrote about a quality of friendship in a very sensitive way, which you both now interpret in a television production. This great bond borne between two Victorian men.

JB: It was friendship when friendship was allowed and respectable.

EH: The great era of the club and I think they are both clubbable characters. I mean that's gone now, that sort of male friendship.

JF: Yes, but as you yourself noted, I read, that the relationship between Holmes and Watson is the basis for a lot of other relationships in fictional detective work ever since, particularly on the telly, you quoted things like Starsky and Hutch.

EH: True. Yes well I think, Jeremy once said all these programmes have a book-end; they have a scene at the beginning and a scene at the end, and to some extent they are the modern version of Holmes and Watson.

JB: They work as a double act to a large degree. It's like John Thaw and Kevin. We all have to relate off somebody and maybe this was one of the originals - friendships - but it's been taken forward because it's a very good format.

JF: It's interesting that it always works with two men, as well, isn't it, certainly in the detective field. I suspect what you're talking about, the era of the Victorian gentleman's club and everything, that it was sort of acceptable to show that kind of soft spot or emotion for each other in the tight world of the detective format.

JB: They did try with Dr. Watson as a woman with Joanna Woodward - I haven't seen it.

RM: Really?

JB: Yes, yes Joanna Woodward.

JF: Extraordinary. Who played Holmes?

JB: George C. Scott I think.

EH: That's two things I've heard this morning which are deeply worrying. (All laugh)

URL
2012-11-26 в 03:53 

RM: Well lets talk about the change you would have experienced, when Edward you took over from David Burke. Were you worried - not about him coming - but the change in your sparring partner on screen?

JB: Yes. Yes, truthfully. But then this miracle occurred (gestures to EH) and, Edward is a very gentle person and very sensitive and so tried very hard not to upset or shake the boat in any way, and succeeded. What could have been a disaster for the series turned into a bonus. It was a great shock at the beginning, because David and I had been together for about a year and a half, we'd built up a great rapport and he wanted to go home because he had a young son called Tom, who was then 2 - he's a bit older now - and wanted to be with him. In actual fact it was his wife who suggested you, wasn't it?

EH: Yes, we were working together.

JB: That's right.

EH: And David had been trying to decide what he was going to do.

RM: How did you feel about being cast in the part?

EH: Well Jeremy is very generous about it, but it in actual fact it couldn't have been made easier. For one thing I think you start off with an advantage, in that there is a definite visual picture of these two men, I mean you think of Watson with the bowler hat and perhaps Holmes in the dark coat, so in a sense, I don't think I looked all that different once you've got all the clothes on. Everybody made it so easy, Jeremy was incredibly helpful, Michael, our producer - the greatest compliment was, I don't know, the second episode I was in and I was called David several times, and I thought that's all right.

RM: Was it Lord Olivier, was it to you? He's quoted as saying when a well-known actor was taking over an established part - it was you, yes - 'never be afraid to pinch his best bits, dear boy'. Have you taken any of David's -?

URL
2012-11-26 в 03:55 

JM: You said on the set he's (points to JB), watching him is wonderful because he's like one of the Victorian actor managers.

EH: Well he-

(JB laughs and looks at EH expectantly for an explanation)

EH: - he's been marvellously...he creates a wonderful atmosphere, which is as they did, but he's got an amazing ability to bring that Edwardian thing onto the screen, which is very difficult to do.

RM: I think we've got a faint sniff of why it works so well between the two of you in the role. Thank you both very much indeed

URL
2012-11-26 в 12:19 

koudai
specific dream rabbit
это не то интервью, но спасибо!

2012-11-26 в 15:37 

Ирма Банева
Серый лебедь
koudai, а его Вы тоже переведёте? Если не трудно, конечно...

2012-11-26 в 16:12 

koudai
specific dream rabbit
Ирма Банева, я постараюсь, но может быть немного попозже. я сейчас занята в реале((((

2012-11-26 в 16:21 

Ирма Банева
Серый лебедь
koudai, понятно. Подождём.

2012-11-30 в 20:17 

Пожалуйста ;) У меня есть транскрипты ещё 3-х интервью, и я записывала интервью о "необитаемом острове", хотите? ;)

Cat

URL
2012-12-01 в 14:09 

Путник&
Гость, вы выложите, пожалуйста. А там, может, кто-нибудь из переводчиков будет иметь свободное время и захочет перевести)

     

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